Some interesting Marathi names

Marathi surnames are very interesting. One of the most fascinating surnames is Pai. In Marathi language, it is just one letter.

I have tried to group some Marathi surnames into some interesting combinations (rough meanings in parenthesis).

  1. Wagh (Tiger)
  2. Waghdhare (Tiger catcher)
  3. Waghmare (Tiger killer)
  1. Khare (True)
  2. Khote (False)
  1. Landge (Wolf)
  2. Kolhe (Fox)
  1. Bhoot (Ghost)
  2. Deo/Dev (God)
  3. Bhute (Ghosts?)
  1. Muley (Root)
  2. Zhade (Tree/Plant)
  3. Phule (Flower)

The list continues… is very long!

Last names… again

This time, about Marathi surnames.

Wikipedia states:

“In Maharashtra and Gujarat, the naming system is very similar to the first-middle-last format followed in the western world. e.g. “Sunil Manohar Gavaskar”, here “Sunil” is the (first) name of the person. “Manohar” is the father’s name, which is often abbreviated as an initial, and “Gavaskar” is the last or family name. Traditionally, women take their husband’s name as their middle name and also adopt his family name.”

Clearly, the total number of surnames in India itself tends to infinity, independent of the region, but a generic observation of our surroundings will clearly illustrate that Maharashtrian surnames itself contribute as an infinitely large set.

Concatenated Bengali last names

Two things about an eastern state of India, West Bengal, surprise me:

1. Why is it still called West Bengal, when East Bengal has been renamed to Bangladesh and is not even a part of India?

2. The Bengalis have very peculiar last names (surnames). At one end are surnames such as Sen, Gupta, Dutta, Choudhary, Ghosh, Maulik, Das, Roy. At the other end are concatenated surnames – Sengupta, Duttachoudhary, Ghoshmaulik, Dasgupta, Roychoudhary. Sometimes these names are written in mixed cases, e.g., Roychoudhary or RoyChoudhary. Sometimes even with a space, e.g., Ghoshmaulik or Ghosh Maulik (with the space!)